ROI – not always a matter of money

January 17, 2009 at 7:48 pm 4 comments

Read this today:

There is endless talk online and off-line of increased traffic to websites, comments galore, users joining your community, and community development. The question posed through all of this discussion is the concept of measuring ROI in Social Media.Kyle Lacy, Social Media – Indianapolis, Jan 2009

Well, for some of us, measuring the ROI isn’t an option. In the Government sector, our success is to a great extent measured in terms of medium- and long-term policy objectives. A lot of our work at www.nhs.uk is about health promotion – the success of which can only be measured when a generation has passed.

Which leads me to a question – how on earth do we justify investment in social media in this context? I hope we can discuss this at the forthcoming UKGovCamp barcamp. And here, of course, if you care to.

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Blimey, UKGovWeb09 is a sell-out! We must save Bletchley Park

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Steph Gray  |  January 17, 2009 at 9:28 pm

    But measuring ROI – even if the R isn’t financial – is absolutely what we need to do in the public sector.

    I think Michelle will be running a session on this at Barcamp, but if you have any thoughts in the meantime on the various kinds of indicator we should be using, we’d be grateful for your input!

    http://talk.dius.gov.uk/diuswiki/wiki/Evaluation_of_Online_Engagement

    Reply
  • 2. peeebeee  |  January 18, 2009 at 12:09 am

    Thanks, Steph – count me in for that session for sure. Will check out your wiki, too.

    Reply
  • 3. Kyle Lacy  |  January 19, 2009 at 1:40 pm

    Thanks for the link. 🙂 I agree with Steph. Even if ROI is not financial there is always a plus side to using social media. Whether we are speaking on brand development or actual acquisition.

    Reply
  • 4. Anne Marie Cunningham  |  January 29, 2009 at 7:20 pm

    Very good question. In essence though it is the same as any public health intervention. You are likely to judge success through proximal outcomes and process measures.

    Reply

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